Thrown into the Deep End

May 18, 2010

Filed under: Caregiver Issues,Uncategorized — Tags: , , — Alexis @ 1:08 PM

Did you see Michelle Singletary’s column this weekend in the Boston Globe? I like her column, The Color of Money. She writes in a straight-forward, honest manner, with guidance targeted at “regular folks” like myself.

This weekend she wrote about essentially being thrown into the deep end of the pool of elder care. If you read her column, you saw that her feelings, questions, fears, and sense of being overwhelmed and without direction are those very same feelings that most children of seniors (or healthier spouses of seniors) are experiencing every day.

While I can’t make your parent or spouse healthier, and I can’t bring back their memory skills, I can make it easier for you to handle your new caretaking role. The elder law attorney’s job has many aspects – for one, I help elders stretch out their assets to stay at home for as long as possible.

How do I do this? We look at MassHealth benefits and Veterans Benefits as a way of bringing more help into the home. We look at selling the home and building an in-law apartment on a child’s house. We explore setting up a contract between parent and child that allows the child to quit her job and care for her parent but still earn some income. And if nursing home is a possibility, we explore ways to maintain a healthy spouse at home and also explore various methods of safely and legally transferring some assets to children.

But the elder law attorney’s role goes beyond this – my job is also to pull in other professionals who can help you become a better – and more sane – caregiver. I may invite in an Alzheimer’s coach to teach a family how to work with a family member who is changing before their eyes; a geriatric nurse to guide a thoughtful conversation on wishes for end of life care; a geriatric care manager to create and manage a schedule of home health aides – and more.

I can’t get you out of the deep end of the pool. Life takes our parents and spouses in certain directions. But I can teach you how to swim.

Veterans Benefits: Aid & Attendance Benefits

October 26, 2009

Filed under: Living at Home,Veterans Benefits — Tags: , — Alexis @ 11:31 AM

Most of my clients need a little extra help at home but aren’t sure how to pay for it. When we look at their savings and project how long those funds will work for them, the bottom line is usually this: if the client had just a little more cushion, they could stay at home, with the proper supports, for longer. But where to find the money?

For many of the Greatest Generation, the answer lies in Veterans Benefits. There is a fantastic program that few seniors and their families know about: Aid & Attendance. Once you qualify, the VA will send a monthly check that you use to pay caregivers, buy medical equipment, remodel a bathroom to be wheelchair accessible, pay rent at assisted living – whatever you decide is the best and most effective use of that money. This is the most logical, pragmatic long-term care program I know of. It helps seniors stay at home or in an assisted living – and out of a nursing home – for longer. All without limiting you to certain home health aide agencies, rolling deductibles, and a lot of the impediments that come with other support programs.

The application process for the A&A program is not for the faint of heart. There are reams of papers to fill out (of course), and it can take at least six months to receive approval. More to the point, the VA regulations are hard to find, and if you can find them, impossible to understand. More than almost any other government program, you will need an elder law attorney or a qualified veterans representative to walk you through the planning process. Without this help, it is very difficult to obtain the maximum benefits you are entitled to.

In order to assist you, an attorney must be “certified” by the VA and take requisite training. I have made it my business to become certified and receive the necessary education so that I can help my clients stay at home for longer.